Archive for » October, 2010 «

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Charlie & the Snitch MaSheen…

In the fifth year of my 20-yr federal prison experience (1995), I recall watching the prosecution of Hollywood Madam to the Stars, Heidi Fleiss, on TV.  My kind of girl.  Certainly had more balls than snitch-actor Charlie Sheen—who cooperated w/the prosecution.  Heidi’s assessment of Charlie about sums him up:  “The guy’s a rat!”

Heidi Fleiss

Impressed by Heidi after her conviction for state crimes (tax-evasion, money-laundering and pandering), I wrote a letter to the judge suggesting that they send her to FCI McKean, PA, for community service.  We’d have treated the girl right!  I never got a response.

You’d think that Charlie would’ve grown up at some point.  He’s certainly a successful actor.  The behaviors he managed to get tagged for are relatively impressive.

I always get a charge outta all-too-many in the public who believe that those in prison are criminals. Given my direct experience as a criminal/civil investigator out of Detroit for 17-yrs, 25+yrs in assorted jails and prisons throughout the world, a PsyD as a doctor of forensic psych and 50+yrs as a revolutionary political activist, I’d guess that easily some 85% of those in the American Gulag do not belong there.

To start with, think of all the top criminals in America–the majority of the wealthy corp-elite–who are running around scot-free…or their self-entitled “little snakes…”

At 16, Charlie got busted for reefer.  At 17 for the fraudulent use of credit card numbers.  At 25—already long exhibiting out-of-control behaviors and addictions—he “accidentally” shot his girlfriend, Kelly Preston.  She survived to go on and marry John Travolta.

Denise Richards

Over the years, he’s had an impressive series of girlfriends and marriages, all ending in abusive situations—including a number of threats and near homicides with weapons.  Charlie likes his drugs, especially coke.  But unlike the vast majority of folks, he can’t say when

Of course, what do you give a man-boy who already has an excess of female adulation?  Why, of course:  Kayla the Coxx-man.  His latest fling was Ms. Coxx (Warning: VERY explicit).  Heidi Fleiss calls Kayla “a chick with a little something extra…”

Kayla Coxx

Ms. Coxx is an incomplete transsexual.  Normally, in assessing the truth of such a relationship, I’d have to figure that Charlie’s too smart to out himself.  However, Charlie’s not the sharpest knife on the block…  Given his addictions, lack of maturity, and a rich fantasy life along with an incapacity for limited self-gratification, I’d definitely entertain a syndrome for homoerotic self-love.

Many confuse the feelings between homosexuality and homoerotic behaviors.  That confusion can lead to extreme swings of philiac or phobic reactions.  A homosexual is an individual who has the capacity for a full love relationship with a person of the same sex, usually known and realized.    

   Homo-eroticism is an expression of self-love.  The psychic object is on one’s own genitals, not the other person per se.  While it may assume participation with others, that is not necessarily the primary focus.  Psychologically and therapeutically, there’s a significant difference.

But enough of Charlie.  I’d say we’re only going to be treated to more of the same so long as he’s socially functional (and people continue to enable him and put up with his bullshit).  Update: In fact, Charlie found some justice in apparently acquiring HIV

Heidi’s more interesting.  As a pre-teen growing up in the affluent LA neighborhood of Los Feliz, California, Heidi organized a very successful baby-sitting service, discovering a formative capacity for business.

In her 20s, Heidi became a Hollywood Madam.  She never had to recruit her girls.  University students, aspiring models and actresses (no shortage there) flocked to her by word of mouth.  She charged from $1500 to $1 million for their services.  Her girls flew all over the world.  They kept 40% plus tips.  Heidi became a multi-millionaire.

The usual assortment of established pimps and prostitutes became jealous and ratted her out.  The cops that weren’t on her payroll soon enough set up a sting and entrapment operation to shut her down.

She was busted in ’93 by the state and later by the feds.  She was convicted in a couple of celebrated cases and served a total of 3 yrs.  Charlie Sheen—who was only one of two tricks to be exposed (the clown paid by check)—voluntarily testified that he paid Heidi some $35,000 for sex with her girls.  (Charlie liked them real young-looking and usually in school-girl costume.)

Charlie didn’t have to testify, but there it is.  That’s his character–or rather, the lack of it…

Dr. Publico (Nick Medvecky, PsyD), October 2010…

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The Roots of Evil…

One of the interesting books I studied in prison was Christopher Hibbert’s, The Roots of Evil:  A Social History of Crime & Punishment, 1963.

Knowing history is critical to understanding today’s reality and how to change it.  Here, I quote a few references from this remarkable book.  It will become apparent from where today’s laws are derived and how far we have yet to travel…bearing in mind that these laws were enacted against real people who had to serve real punishments…  In the interests of space and modern usage, I’ve edited the quotes: more…

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State Crime News (1)…

The following will be at least a monthly feature of the American Tribune in the interest of “fair & balanced” reporting on the subject of crime…

Awaiting justice...

One of the phenomena that this writer has witnessed from 22+ years in the American gulag is the fact that certain characteristics seem to go hand-in-hand with certain types of crime.

There are a vast majority of prisoners in the US who can be described as “statutory offenders,” who are not criminals in this definition except by the quasi-religious, puritanical morality imposed upon them by legislative edict.

These include the moral and politically temporal sensibilities of consensual laws such as gambling, the individual use of recreational drugs, adult sex, certain institutional frauds and tax evasions, and a host of political protest actions. more…

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Morality vs. Liberty…

The American tribune has spoken to a variety of prison-related issues and factors that have contributed to the American gulag—the largest prison system on the planet.

An Earlier “Tea Party”…

Last week I concluded a 4-part series on the post-Civil War period concerning some of the foundations to the modern Prison Industrial complex.

Those articles included the exception clause to the 13th Amendment of the US Constitution, Black Codes and Jim Crow, the sell-out to the South of the Republican Party in 1877, and the resultant creation of neo-slavery thru private convict leasing and prison-industrialization by the states.

Another foundation building on that period to the modern prison industrial complex was the singular contribution by Anthony Comstock, an otherwise nondescript son of a farmer, who at 19 joined the 17th Connecticut Infantry in the Army of the Republic.  His main problems were his complaints about the soldiers cursing. more…

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Knights o’ the Post…

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised when I read in a recent issue of the Memphis Commercial Appeal that one of the most iconic of movement photographers, Ernest C. Withers, was apparently a closely-supervised, paid informant for the FBI: #ME-338-R.  (The R is for Race.)

The news media has so far gathered FOIA files of his informant status for the years 1968 thru 1970.  While thousands of pages have been revealed, the FBI refuses to release other documents.

As far as the civil rights and black movement was concerned, Withers and his camera were everywhere.  Dying back in 2007 at 85, he had covered everything from the old Negro League baseball and the Memphis Blues scene, to the Emmett Till case (1955), Little Rock high school integration (1957), Ole Miss and James Meredith in ’62, up thru the last hours of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in ’68.  Withers learned his craft in the Army during World War II. more…

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Prison Industry History (4)…

This is the final article in this series (Oct 19-22, 2010).  The connections have been drawn between the reality we face today in gulag America to its foundation in convict leasing and prison industrialization in the post-bellum period (1865-77).  And is now meeting with a resurgence thru prison privateering…

Tennessee Coal Creek War

One of the central books in this discovery process is Worse Than Slavery…” by David M. Oshinsky (1997).  The South initiated the technique of criminalizing those they could, notably the former slaves in order to disenfranchise them from political power, dehumanize them in the popular culture, and to exploit their labor.  Over 100 years of Jim Crow helped create this perversion even in the midst of the struggle for democracy. more…

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Prison Industry History (3)…

This article is third in a series.  The previous two were the 20th and 21st of October, 2010…

In the immediate period of the South after the Civil War (1865), there was a severe shortage of white males and a surplus of newly freed blacks.  In the competition between them, whites had the decided advantage of greater political and social resources.

Private Prison Industry…

For several years, the Union Army and the Freedman’s Bureau enforced emancipation, but by 1877 the Republican Party surrendered the South in return for the election.  The stage was set for Jim Crow and mass black criminalization. 

Labor-intensive industries, such as cotton, lent themselves to plantation organization.  Within short order, a number of Black Codes were specifically created to provide the law and sanctions to maintain this labor.  These included the Vagrancy Act, which provided that all blacks over the age of 18 must provide proof of a job at the beginning of every year. more…

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Prison Industry History (2)…

…This article is continued from yesterday, October 20th, 2010…

At the conclusion of the American Civil War, white Southerners soon enacted political control over the newly emancipated slaves.  Initially, the exception clause to the 13th Amendment (1865; outlawing slavery) allowed a form of re-enslavement by criminalizing blacks.

Col. “Ned” Richardson

Most blacks remained where they were working as tenants or field hands at whatever was paid them.  One Union officer was quoted as stating, “To be free and black in Mississippi is first to beg, then to steal, and then to starve.  That is their reality.”  For all too many, that more or less became their lot over the next 100 years.

White Southerners used the power that was available to them:  Political power over the laws.  David M. Oshinski’s book, Worse Than Slavery…” (1997), tracks how the political and justice system was used as a tool to re-enslave many blacks, to disenfranchise the race from all political power, to dehumanize them as a people before society, and to lay the foundation for the modern prison/industry system in America. more…

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Prison Industry History (1)…

There are episodes in the histories of all peoples that are joyful and shameful.  Some to be praised and commemorated, and others seemingly best forgotten, or worse, blamed on the “other.”

Worse Than Slavery…

One of the best forgotten would seem to be the immediate period after the American Civil War.  And, in fact, much of it seems to have been, indeed, “forgotten.”  Too bad.  It’s true: History forgotten is history repeated.

When I was in my sixth year of imprisonment in the contemporary American gulag–currently at three million and still growing–a friend sent me a just-published book, “Worse Than Slavery,” Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice, by David M. Oshinsky (1996).

If one has a personal library that includes any American history, “Worse Than Slavery” is definitely one of those to include.  If my 20+ years in the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) has any positive meaning, knowing how we came to this point is certainly one of them. more…

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Hate & Hypocrisy in the Home of the Brave…

Given the news over the past weekend, I’m reminded of some time I spent in Mississippi in ’63 and ’64.  I was lucky…Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner, not so lucky…

House that blood built…

Many years later, I had an acquaintance in one of the federal prisons—don’t even recall his real name, everyone called him Mississippi Mud.  He was an old guy in a wheelchair and he’d been convicted on some ancient civil rights case…a lynching.  Mud was quite a character. more…